A fresh pair of eyes: a new Melburnian’s perspective of our city’s wildlife

Peewee peewee. Neerk neerk. Silence. Vroom vroom. Beep. Honk honk. A cacophony of sounds that may be obvious to some or go largely unnoticed by others. Depending on which Melbourne suburb you

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The walks and wonders of Phillip Island

Last year I explored Phillip Island and its nature and conservation reserves, each location providing insight into the significance of this popular coastal destination. During my short stay of a few

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Turtles in trouble: looking out for the Eastern Long-neck

Australia has more than 25 species of endemic freshwater turtles, some found only in single stretches of river or water systems. In my region of the Corangamite Shire, south-west of

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The heathland sanctuaries of Bayside

It’s a typical winter’s morning in Melbourne: raining, windy and ten degrees. But despite the weather, a group of dedicated volunteers has donned their beanies, gathered at a small heathland

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Tarpaulins and science

Tarpaulins and science. That’s what they should have called it. Huddled beneath a tarp sagging with the weight of an unseasonable deluge as I burned a leech off a stranger’s

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The Fab Five: Finches of Victoria

Finches have captured our attention for aeons, and around the world a number of similar-looking bird families have come to be commonly referred to as finches. They have a habit

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Australian magpies: the playful protectors

Beautiful, vicious, cheeky, scary, intelligent, psychopathic. These are some of the words people have used to describe the Australian Magpie since it was voted the 2017 Australian Bird Of The

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It’s just before a quarter to seven in the morning; the temperature is over 25 degrees and the sky is streaked with pink, purple and orange clouds. It should be autumn,

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Located in Nelson in south-west Victoria, this serene walk leads to a boardwalk through saltmarshes and a bird hide. It offers nice views of Lake Oxbow and allows bush walkers

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This is a guest article by Viktoria Rother. Dinosaur eyes. That’s what I told my class of adult EAL* learners they had. Dinosaur eyes watching me and my every move.

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