Tag: science

School students blaze trail in bid to help tackle climate change
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School students blaze trail in bid to help tackle climate change

Earlier this year, the United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres referred to climate change as ‘the most systemic threat to humankind’. He certainly isn’t wrong. Climate change rhetoric can often be disheartening – all doom and gloom and time running out – but there are many groups who remain optimistic about our future and are doing...

The emu-wren diaries
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The emu-wren diaries

There is a bold plan underway to bring Mallee Emu-wrens back to South Australia, where wildfires have wiped them out. Simon Verdon details the decline of this mysterious and beautiful mallee bird and the efforts underway to save the species. 2014 Monday, January 13th The heathlands stretch out in every direction, as far as the...

Translating nature’s lessons: an interview with Dr Jenny Martin
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Translating nature’s lessons: an interview with Dr Jenny Martin

Science explains the everyday familiar in terms of the unfamiliar – it thrives on specialised language consisting of untranslatable words and symbols. Science communication is an essential aspect of many scientists’ careers – aiming to make scientific knowledge and understanding accessible to all. When it comes to the environmental sciences, science communication is integral to...

Awestruck by albatrosses
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Awestruck by albatrosses

I stopped, captivated, entranced. Is this real? It can’t be. What a beautiful creature; those eyes, so intense, focused and alert. It was then I realised I was talking out loud. My colleague smiled at me, that knowing smile of having been there before – an understanding of that awestruck feeling which opened the door...

On the hunt for superpowered slugs
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On the hunt for superpowered slugs

As a diver and dive guide, I have always felt a bit awkward searching for the small, hidden things at the bottom of the ocean rather than looking for bigger, faster, more obvious fishes, mammals and other creatures. I guess I have always found the search rewarding. I have felt pride in finding creatures other...

The peak of cold resistance
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The peak of cold resistance

Australia is hot and dry. Ask any tourist on sun-drenched Bondi Beach and they will affirm this well-known paradigm. Yet although much of our flora has adapted to thrive in our baking interior and dry open woodlands, many unique plants have evolved in a very different setting: the frigid landscape of the Australian High Country....

Remembering the Thylacine: Endangered, Extinct… Resurrected?
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Remembering the Thylacine: Endangered, Extinct… Resurrected?

Amid the battle to save our increasing list of threatened and endangered species it is important to remember the ones already lost to history. Threatened Species Day commemorates the date on which the last known Tasmanian Tiger died in Hobart Zoo in 1936. Though numbers had been in rapid decline for decades, it was not...

Sugarbag Bees lend a hand in Australian fruit crop pollination
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Sugarbag Bees lend a hand in Australian fruit crop pollination

Bee stings are worse than wedgies. Still, I’m squirming and dreading bending over while wearing this bright white bee jumpsuit. My supervisor informs me – while smirking – that the tag of the suit reads ‘Extra Large’, making it clear that my 170-centimetre stature must be considered gargantuan in the beekeeping world. There is only...