Tag: CSIRO Publishing

The good, the bad and the prickly
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The good, the bad and the prickly

Beautifully strange in form, members of the Echinodermata phylum appear to drift between plant and animal. However, these unusual organisms are actually more closely related to humans than plants, or even insects. This animal group includes some of the most “sea-like” animals such as seastars, but also less appreciated ones like sand dollars and, my...

Ocean of wonders
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Ocean of wonders

‘[The Pacific Ocean] has been a frontier to explore, a space to conquer, a resource to plunder – and a place of infinite wonder…’ Have you ever wondered why the ‘Pacific’ Ocean is named that way? In November 1520, Ferdinand Magellan, after a perilous voyage through the rough seas of the Atlantic, finally reached a...

Tackling the myths and misunderstandings of shark attacks
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Tackling the myths and misunderstandings of shark attacks

I’ll never forget the summer of 2014. The scent of salt in the air, the sun slowly setting over the bay, and around me the steady burbling of seawater flowing into the tanks. Circling inside the largest tank were 10 timid gummy sharks (Mustelus antarcticus), who would often recognise my hand in the water not...

On the road to a more sustainable science
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On the road to a more sustainable science

Science is often seen as something that operates in isolation, used and trusted for producing knowledge, which is then passed on to others – the ones that will eventually make decisions – with limited continued interactions. The authors of Enhancing Science Impact: Bridging Research, Policy and Practice for Sustainability suggest that if we are to do...

Battling inertia: the role of social science in sustainability
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Battling inertia: the role of social science in sustainability

It’s a question many of us have asked ourselves: why, in the face of prolific and proliferating environmental issues, do our societies continue to do so little to avoid these impending catastrophes? Or, as the editors of the recently published Social Science and Sustainability would put it: ‘What are the reasons for inertia?’ It’s a fair...

One drop to kill them all
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One drop to kill them all

Okay, so let’s check that I’ve set this up right. The grass is in, I’ve got a little dirt mound in the corner for burrowing, some old leaves and twigs for shelter, a few rocks for an outcrop of sorts and the Coke bottle lid is filled with water so that they can drink. All...